Public relations firms such as FeishmanHillard are moving toward an integrated service offering, but as a senior PR contact posited to me earlier today, will FH’s Omnicom agency partners welcome this new quasi-competitor?

Call it “integrated communications” or “integrated marketing,” the transition will not be easy. As Dave Senay, president and chief executive at FleishmanHillard in St. Louis, pointed out: “About a third are turned on by” the new vision, “about a third will go along with it and about a third will not get it.”

Why are single-focus PR, social, mobile, and traditional agencies affected so deeply by the digital r/evolution? The modes and mediums by which we market have changed dramatically in less than five years, e.g., mobile, social, apps, and data influence. Data can now inform (and complicate) a multitude of related independent and interdependent channels. Long gone is the traditional purchase funnel … and long live the analytics and measurement industry.

Welcome the new marketing mavens. Call them Math Men and Women, strategists, data scientists, … these are the principles and collectives (agencies or otherwise) that understand how to harness the integrated marketing ecosystem. They ground their recommendations in strategy and planning (an understanding of the customer), manifest them in effective creative, build them with tech, and measure them in analytics.

And while traditional PR agencies and large holding companies reconfigure (along with mobile- and social-only shops) to serve this brave new marketing world, agencies that were born digital – that were built for media integration – had better maintain their sprint. Everyone is gunning for the leader, and right now the leaders aren’t the biggest or most specialized agencies; the leaders are scaling to meet the increasing demand for integrated services.

Read the article that inspired this post at nytimes.com.